Spectacular, Spectacular, No words in the vernacular

Mirazozo: Architects of Air

A giant inflatable sculpture filled with a kaleidoscope of colour and labyrinth of tunnels and domes. It is positioned on the forecourt of Sydney opera house throughout January 2011.

3-27 January 2011

10-7pm

Sydney Opera House Forecourt

Suitable for all ages, however 16 yrs and under to be accompanied by an adult

Mirazozo is inspired by nature, geometry and Islamic architecture.  The sculptural structures are referred to as a ‘luminaria’, and are totally hand made. The term ‘luminaria’ comes from the fact that the light that enters the sculpture is created from the daylight streaming through the coloured plastic and the luminosity it creates. It’s original feature is the ‘illuminated seam’ that is found in all the principal domes- where in many of the domes the light streaming through is coloured these seams are transparent slits which offset the surrounding colours almost providing a ‘digital’ effect.

The original EMOs

By Chava Kuchar

What is German Expressionism? Or, what was German Expressionism? Was it just a group of German’s hanging around being emotional? Personally, as much as I would like to see an emotional German it doesn’t sufficiently portray the movement that was spearheaded by some of the European Greats.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s ‘After the Luncheon’, 1879, France

Odilon Redon’s ‘Christ and the Samaritan Woman’, 1895, France

Edvard Munch’s ‘Jealousy’, 1913, Norway

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So much better than Times New Roman!

By Chava Kuchar

The term coined, by whom I’m not so sure, for people who have an unnatural obbsession with typography is ‘typophile’. It seems fitting and certainly is applicable for some of the people in my life, such as my husband, Ari Kuchar, a self proclaimed typophile who will sit down for hours at a time a watch typography based short films. Continue reading

Silver Humpty Dumpty, Flying Semen and Why This is SO Japan

By Natan Kuchar

Japan is a country drenched in Buddhist and Shinto traditions, though after the atomic bombs were dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a new sub-culture called Otaku, or The Electronic Age, was phased in, hoping to relieve the country from its devastation. The Electronic Age initially came out of a sheer need for Japanese to get their hands on things like radios and spare car parts, but the sale of electronic goods quickly turned into the boom of video games, electronic toys and gadgets, anime and even a new interpretation and role for sex. Otaku culture is a complete aversion to Japanese tradition, and Takashi Murakami, dubbed by French magazine Modern Painters as Ota-king, became an artist synonymous with the celebration of a new refreshingly trivial and superficial popular culture. Continue reading

I heart HART (hair+art=hart)

By Chava Kuchar

Are you ‘hair aware’? Until recently, I certainly wasn’t. My eyes were closed to the significance of hair and its meaning…but, this isn’t really true, because if fabulous looking hair is the ying, then I am certainly the yang. The truth is that I have covered my hair since I got married for both personal and religious reasons and under a scarf fabulous it is not. Continue reading

The good, the bad and the ugly

By Chava Kuchar

By good I mean there is top use of typography, and by bad I mean ‘the man’. The message is very interesting and has a lot of depth, but the ugly is in the creepiest damn voice I ever did hear!

Check out others at the Kinetic Typography channel on Vimeo